Carly’s Voice

reaching autistic child, non-verbal autism, technology for autism, voice assist for autism, aphasia in children,

Carly Fleischmann was unable to communicate. Diagnosed with autism and related disorders by the age of two, she screamed, threw herself to the floor, smeared feces, moved constantly, and barely slept at night. An attentive family plus hours of daily therapy helped teach her rudiments like walking and feeding herself. Experts advised her parents to consider residential care.

But one day during a therapy session, Carly reached for the computer. Slowly, using one finger, she typed

help

teeth

hurt.

Her therapists were astonished. It took months and much coaxing to get her to use the computer again (at that time, an augmentative communication device). But she began to recognize that communication was essential. Technology made it possible.

What emerged from her arduous single strokes on the keypad showed a girl who wasn’t mentally retarded, as her doctors suspected, but someone spirited, insightful, and intelligent. She wrote about wanting to have fun with normal kids. She asked to do things she’d always wanted to try. And she tried to convey what it was like to live in an autistic body. She explained that behaviors (like banging her head on the floor and bleating loudly) erupted from her like liquid would burst from a can of Coke when it had been shaken and opened. She said those behaviors helped block the sensory input of sight and sound that constantly overwhelmed her.

A few years ago, a segment about Carly’s new-found communication aired on 20/20.

Now Carly uses technology to communicate with a world that’s ever more open to her. She keeps up with a busy Twitter  feed and Facebook fans. She answers questions, promotes autism awareness, and says that she feels part of a larger community by connecting with people through social media.

Technology allows Carly to share what she calls her “inner voice.” Check out Carly’s Cafe, an interactive web video, to experience a coffee shop as she experiences it. And take a look at the memoir she wrote with her father, Carly’s Voice: Breaking Through Autism
to better understand this bright engaging girl whose world unlocked thanks to a keyboard.

Oh, and don’t think Carly’s drive to move forward has slowed. Now 17 years old, she was recently asked to appear on a panel at The Nantucket Project, a prestigious request for any expert, even more impressive that she would be their youngest ever. Senator John Kerry was also scheduled to give a presentation. She tweeted him in advance, challenging him to take a seat on the panel so she could ask him questions. Her challenge was retweeted thousands of times by her followers and Sen. Kerry did indeed do as she asked. Her first question to him was, “What have you done in the Senate to help autism and do you think it’s enough?” Watch the video here.
We may not know what sparks autism, from inflammatory responses in a pregnant mother’s body to systemic changes in the body to another step in emerging neurodiversity. We do know that Carly and many more like her are with us, speaking in voices we’re meant to hear.

About Laura Grace Weldon

Laura Grace Weldon is a writer and editor, perhaps due to an English professor's scathing denunciation of her writing as "curious verbiage." She's the author of "Free Range Learning," a handbook of natural learning and "Tending," a poetry collection. (lauragraceweldon.com) She's working on her next book, "Subversive Cooking" (subversivecooking.com). She lives on Bit of Earth Farm where she is a barely useful farm wench. Although she has deadlines to meet she often wanders from the computer to preach hope, snort with laughter, cook subversively, talk to chickens and cows, discuss life’s deeper meaning with her surprisingly tolerant offspring, sing to bees, hide in books, walk dogs, concoct tinctures, watch foreign films, and make messy art.
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2 Responses to Carly’s Voice

  1. athenivandx says:

    Awesome! Thanks for sharing this! I found your blog through the autism tag on wordpress. I have read Carly’s Voice and it is indeed a wonderful book! I am autistic too, so I love to read things written by other autistics, both verbal and nonverbal.

    Athena

    Like

  2. Kimerly W. says:

    Made my day! Crying tears of joy for Carly! So happy her parent’s didn’t give up on her, and for the gift of technology. Date: Thu, 25 Oct 2012 13:15:28 +0000 To: queenkimerly@hotmail.com

    Like

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