Slacker New Year’s Eve

stay home on New Year's Eve, family time on New Year's, slow down on New years,

Years ago we started a new tradition. Slacker New Year’s Eve. No more loud, crowded events. No more babysitting nightmares. And no more driving back home in the early morning hours on icy roads. What a relief.

Instead we stay home with the kids. We put lots of goodies on the table, including snacks that are rarely seen in our fussy-about-nutrition household. We get out amusements like board games and videos, build a fire in the fireplace, and basically slouch around together. It’s fantastic. After all the holiday rush it feels downright indulgent.

A key element of Slacker New Year’s Eve is the no-bedtime promise. On this one night we’ve always told our kids they can stay up all night if they want. For years our kids have tucked us in bed not long after midnight, then done their best to stay up until dawn. A few times they’ve made it. Then they sleep in at least till noon. That tends to result in a nice quiet New Year’s Day morning for mom and dad.

Now our kids are old enough to make their own choices about Slacker New Year’s Eve. I think they’re all staying in and slacking. Me? I’m looking forward to warm jammies, chilled champagne, and hanging out with the people I love. This isn’t about renouncing anything. Slacker New Year’s Eve lets the old year slide out without a fuss and celebrates the upcoming year without effort. Ahhh.

About Laura Grace Weldon

Laura Grace Weldon is a writer and editor, perhaps due to an English professor's scathing denunciation of her writing as "curious verbiage." She's the author of "Free Range Learning," a handbook of natural learning and "Tending," a poetry collection. (lauragraceweldon.com) She's working on her next book, "Subversive Cooking" (subversivecooking.com). She lives on Bit of Earth Farm where she is a barely useful farm wench. Although she has deadlines to meet she often wanders from the computer to preach hope, snort with laughter, cook subversively, talk to chickens and cows, discuss life’s deeper meaning with her surprisingly tolerant offspring, sing to bees, hide in books, walk dogs, concoct tinctures, watch foreign films, and make messy art.
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7 Responses to Slacker New Year’s Eve

  1. Bikil says:

    That’s exactly what we do! Ever since I had my daughter, I don’t want to be away from her on New Year’s Eve, and it’s generally not appropriate to bring a baby or kid to many of my friends’ parties (she’s almost 4 now, but I still wouldn’t want her to be exposed to some of my friends’ well, let’s say, hilarity). I love the mellow New Year’s Eve. We also let the kids stay up, tho they generally are happy to go to bed at 12:05 with us, so far.

  2. Dick Stacy says:

    I whole-heartedly agree ! One year, we baby-sitted the kids and went to a party at a local hotel … totally phony and boring besides! When our kids were kids, we let them stay up and go outside and bang on pots and pans at midnight. They are no longer kids and I miss the noise of the banging pots at midnight on 12/31!

  3. I love slacker New Year’s Eve! Ever since the kids were born we’ve had these. I don’t think I ever want to go back!

  4. awamiba says:

    Oh yes! Ours is pretty much just like this, except that we have grandparents over and silly dancing as well. Love to have a quiet night of it. I’m the only one that makes it to “real” midnight. :)

  5. sixathome says:

    I wonder how I ever managed those late nights! We do the slacker holiday season….No fuss no muss

  6. BobbieSue says:

    This is exactly what we have done for years. Every year I make a nice steak and lobster dinner, by Hubby’s request. The kids each make something as well.
    This year the 6 yr old made cookies, that everyone helped decorate; the 12 year old made the side dishes for dinner and sherbet punch and the 14 yr old made a cheese ball.
    We play board games and watch DVDs in our fuzzy PJs and do silly dances in the kitchen.

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